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Learn about the connections between faith, fashion, and sustainability.

Loving Our Neighbor Means Thinking About the People Behind Our Clothes

By Lizzy Case for Word&Way.

As followers of Jesus, we aim to observe the two great commandments, love God and love neighbor, with our whole lives. But who is our neighbor when it comes to clothes?

Your Clothing Choices Have Global Consequences

By Lizzy Case for Sojourners.

Honoring the labor, expertise, and material resources used to make clothes is an essential way to honor God. It’s time Christians take up the call to care for God’s human and non-human creation through better stewardship of our clothing.

Want to Honor God Through Your Clothing Choices? Here’s How

By Lizzy Case for Sojourners.

So how do Christians honor God through our clothing choices? Here are five ways to dive in and begin embodying Christ’s righteousness in your relationship to your clothes:e.

Meet the ‘Knitting Monk’ and Others Using Slow Fashion as a Spiritual Practice

By Whitney Bauck for Fashionista.com.

A monk, an Episcopalian sister and a "typical clergy spouse" talk about their experiences pursuing textile arts and the Divine.

The Bible Makes a Fashion Statement

By Whitney Bauck for Christianity Today.

Theologian Robert Covolo encourages Christians to take matters of dress and style more seriously.

How to bring Laudato Si' into your wardrobe

By Whitney Bauck for National Catholic Reporter.

What would it take to start enacting a Laudato Si'-like vision for the future of the fashion industry?

What Your Clothes Say About You, According to the Bible

By Céire Kealty for Sojourners.

Scripture suggests our clothes can reflect spiritual and ethical realities, bearing wisdom throughout the Abrahamic faith traditions.

The Demon, the Desert, and the Wardrobe

By Céire Kealty for Sojourners.

Interpreting the Atacama desert clothing crisis as a tangible, spiritual desert, plagued by the demon of clothing waste, proves generative for believers. Itexposes the spiritual relevance of clothing waste, laying bare our disordered desire, haywire appetites, and our multitude of sins—environmental, interpersonal, and transnational.